HELP YOURSELF DEVELOP AS A WRITER OR ARTIST

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHIC TERMS

Posted by Gail Daley on Thursday, April 2, 2015 Under: Business Development

Below is a brief explanation taken from Wikipedia of some terms used in comparing photo file types. I have included it to assist in providing an explanation of the file comparison chart included here. There are two types of image file compression processes: lossless and lossy.

Lossless compression processes reduce file size while preserving a perfect copy of the original uncompressed image. Lossless compression generally, but not always, results in larger files than lossy density. Lossless compression should be used to avoid accumulating stages of re-compression when editing images.

Lossy compression processes preserve an interpretation of the original uncompressed image that while it may appear to be a perfect copy, however, it is not a perfect copy. Often lossy compression is able to achieve smaller file sizes than lossless compression. Most lossy compression processes allow for adjustable compression that trades image quality for file size.

JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) the JPEG/JFIF filename extension is JPG or JPEG. Nearly every digital camera can save images in the JPEG/JFIF format. JPEG applies lossy compression to images, which can result in a significant reduction of the file size.

JPEG 2000 while the compression methods used are different from the ones in standard JFIF/JPEG; they improve quality and compression ratios. However, they also require more a larger memory in your computer.

The TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) is a flexible format usually using either the TIFF or TIF filename extension. It was devised to be easily extendible, and many vendors have introduced proprietary special-purpose tags – with the result that no one reader handles every kind of TIFF file. Some digital cameras can save images in TIFF format, using the LZW compression process. It is not commonly supported by web browsers but remains widely accepted as a photograph file standard in the printing business

RIF refers to raw image formats that are available on some digital cameras, rather than to a specific format. Although there is a standard raw image format, (ISO 12234-2, TIFF/EP), the raw formats used by most cameras are not standardized or documented, and differ among camera manufacturers.

GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) has a limited palliate. This makes the GIF format suitable for storing graphics with relatively few colors such as logos and cartoon style images and simple diagrams or shapes,.

The BMP file format (Windows bitmap) handles graphics files within the Microsoft Windows OS.

The PNG (Portable Network Graphics) file format was created as a free, open-source substitute to GIF.

 

FILE FORMAT COMPARISION CHART

 

File saved from a Photoshop PSD format file, (RGB; 12” X 12”, 72 dpi; 55 layers, 8.6 MB size file).

 

 



# LAYERS


LOSSLESS*


SIZE

JPEG - Low Quality (3)


1


NO


23KB

JPEG - Medium Quality (5)


1


NO


272KB

JPEG - High Quality (8)


1


NO


360 KB

JPEG - Maximum Quality (12)


1


NO


972KB

JPEG 2000


1


YES


1.3MB

PNG


1


YES


1.5MB

ESP (ASCII 85)


1


YES


3.8MB

PDF (ZIP Compression)


55


YES


6.8MB

TIFF (LZW Compression)


55


YES


5.3MB

TIFF (ZIP Compression)


55


YES


5.1MB

 

*lossless file data isn’t discarded when converted to this format, so resolution of the photo is not degraded.

In : Business Development 



A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHIC TERMS

Posted by Gail Daley on Thursday, April 2, 2015 Under: Business Development

Below is a brief explanation taken from Wikipedia of some terms used in comparing photo file types. I have included it to assist in providing an explanation of the file comparison chart included here. There are two types of image file compression processes: lossless and lossy.

Lossless compression processes reduce file size while preserving a perfect copy of the original uncompressed image. Lossless compression generally, but not always, results in larger files than lossy density. Lossless compression should be used to avoid accumulating stages of re-compression when editing images.

Lossy compression processes preserve an interpretation of the original uncompressed image that while it may appear to be a perfect copy, however, it is not a perfect copy. Often lossy compression is able to achieve smaller file sizes than lossless compression. Most lossy compression processes allow for adjustable compression that trades image quality for file size.

JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) the JPEG/JFIF filename extension is JPG or JPEG. Nearly every digital camera can save images in the JPEG/JFIF format. JPEG applies lossy compression to images, which can result in a significant reduction of the file size.

JPEG 2000 while the compression methods used are different from the ones in standard JFIF/JPEG; they improve quality and compression ratios. However, they also require more a larger memory in your computer.

The TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) is a flexible format usually using either the TIFF or TIF filename extension. It was devised to be easily extendible, and many vendors have introduced proprietary special-purpose tags – with the result that no one reader handles every kind of TIFF file. Some digital cameras can save images in TIFF format, using the LZW compression process. It is not commonly supported by web browsers but remains widely accepted as a photograph file standard in the printing business

RIF refers to raw image formats that are available on some digital cameras, rather than to a specific format. Although there is a standard raw image format, (ISO 12234-2, TIFF/EP), the raw formats used by most cameras are not standardized or documented, and differ among camera manufacturers.

GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) has a limited palliate. This makes the GIF format suitable for storing graphics with relatively few colors such as logos and cartoon style images and simple diagrams or shapes,.

The BMP file format (Windows bitmap) handles graphics files within the Microsoft Windows OS.

The PNG (Portable Network Graphics) file format was created as a free, open-source substitute to GIF.

 

FILE FORMAT COMPARISION CHART

 

File saved from a Photoshop PSD format file, (RGB; 12” X 12”, 72 dpi; 55 layers, 8.6 MB size file).

 

 



# LAYERS


LOSSLESS*


SIZE

JPEG - Low Quality (3)


1


NO


23KB

JPEG - Medium Quality (5)


1


NO


272KB

JPEG - High Quality (8)


1


NO


360 KB

JPEG - Maximum Quality (12)


1


NO


972KB

JPEG 2000


1


YES


1.3MB

PNG


1


YES


1.5MB

ESP (ASCII 85)


1


YES


3.8MB

PDF (ZIP Compression)


55


YES


6.8MB

TIFF (LZW Compression)


55


YES


5.3MB

TIFF (ZIP Compression)


55


YES


5.1MB

 

*lossless file data isn’t discarded when converted to this format, so resolution of the photo is not degraded.

In : Business Development